The USP group with some of the U-M conference speakers.

The USP group with some of the U-M conference speakers.

Thanks to funding from the U-M Global REACH Partnership Development Program, MCIRCC welcomed several doctors from the University of Sao Paulo (USP) last month. Over the course of the week, USP and U-M researchers discussed the future of sepsis research and how the two institutions could collaborate to innovate treatment and care.

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition caused by an extreme immune response to an infection that can have devastating consequences. With more than 19 million cases of sepsis worldwide, the disease is the number one “global killer.” However, diagnosing and treating the disease is still extremely challenging for physicians.

“The purpose of this event was to see how the University of Sao Paulo and the University of Michigan could work together to stablish collaborative research on an international level,” said USP’s professor of infectious and parasitic diseases, Aluisio Segurado, MD, PhD.

The group toured the Emergency Critical Care Center (EC3) and met members of the Survival Flight crew.

The group toured the Emergency Critical Care Center (EC3) and met members of the Survival Flight crew.

“I loved the opportunity to share notes and talk science with our counterparts from Sao Paulo. We may care for very different populations, but we’ve got the same goals when it comes to tackling the diseases of critical illness,” said Robert Dickson, MD, who presented his lung microbiome research that was published this year.

One of the most promising partnership opportunities came from meeting with MCIRCC’s Data Science team. With MCIRCC’s precision medicine platform ramping up quickly, both groups were interested in establishing an international, multi-center database of clinical patient data. This could provide a better understanding of genetic backgrounds, antibiotic resistance, and the ability to compare physiological data on a global level.

At the end of the week, both universities agreed that international collaborations will be key to advancing the field and improving patient outcomes. Next year, emergency medicine representatives will travel to Sao Paulo to learn more about their critical care and infectious disease centers.