Milo Engoren, MD


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Milo Engoren, MD


ANESTHESIOLOGY

Milo engoren, md

Professor, Anesthesiology

734-615-7679

engorenm@umich.edu

Milo Engoren, MD received his doctor of medicine from the University of Vermontand completed residencies in internal medicine and anesthesiology at the ClevelandClinic. He also graduated from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute with degrees inBiomedical (Chemical) Engineering and Mathematics. Dr. Engoren was in privatepractice before joining the University of Michigan.

Sangchoul Im, PhD


Sangchoul Im, PhD


Sangchoul Im, PhD

Assistant Research Scientist, Anesthesiology

734-845-5857

scim@med.umich.edu

As an Assistant Research Scientist of the drug-metabolism lab, I have engaged in collaborative research with numerous investigators at the University of Michigan, Northwestern University, University of South Carolina, Medical College of Wisconsin and Marquette University. My research is focused on understanding cytochrome b5's (Cyt b5) effect on drug metabolism of cytochrome P450 (P450) in the presence of Cytochrome P450 Reductase (CPR). The Cyt b5 stimulates P450 metabolism 10% to 1000% depending on substrates. I have been investigating binding structure of the P450-Cyt b5 or P450-CPR complexes and mechanisms of metabolism of P450 to explain the Cyt b5 effect. In order to do that, massive site directed mutagenesis and isotope labeled of the proteins were prepared for enzyme kinetic, enzyme assay and heteronuclear two dimensional solid state (or solution) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. My collaborators are both basic and instrumental scientists that focus on structure of protein, magnetic state of metal of the proteins and vibration mode of heme of P450. My expertise is a "bridge role” in the Biochemistry and Instrumental study. I am an expert in both areas. Proteins prepared for my research are all membrane proteins and need a special technique for protein expression, purification and reconstitution for experiment. Specific labeling by isotope atom is essential to see the structure of the proteins by NMR. Freezing the reaction mixture of P450 and substrate is also important to explain the function of P450. These results have been reported in top journals, including Journal of American Chemical Society, Journal of Biological Chemistry, Biochemistry, etc., as indicated in my CV. While I was not lead or senior author on many of these publications, I played a major role in the experimental design, preparation of reconstituted samples, and analyze the data for the conclusions.

I have also taught my instrumental knowledge to biochemists in my lab such as Postdoctoral Scientist and Research Associates and Biochemistry knowledge to instrumental scientists such as graduate students and postdoctoral scientists. While I am a co-Investigator on My PI’s grants, my expertise is centrally required for the analyses and conclusions reached within the research and therefore essential to the success of the project. Thus, as a team scientist I have effectively supported the successful research of others. This has led to a very fruitful and successful Team Science approach to these research areas where large teams of biochemistry and structural scientists must merge their expertise to draw valuable and appropriate conclusions that have led to paradigm shifting publications.

I am a member of American Chemical Society, International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry and US-Japan Science Promotion Society. I am proud of contributing to the society.

Sachin Kheterpal, MD, MBA


Sachin Kheterpal, MD, MBA



SACHIN KHETERPAL, MD, MBA

Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology

734-936-4280

sachinkh@umich.edu

Dr. Kheterpal is an Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology in the Department of Surgery.  He received his Bachelor of Science, Doctorate of Medicine, and Master in Business Administration from the University of Michigan.  Prior to a clinical anesthesiology career, he was the lead architect of a leading commercially available clinical information system – General Electric Centricity®.  He led the global clinical information system product development and mergers and acquisitions team at GE Healthcare IT.  He brings nearly two decades of informatics, software development, and business administration experience to perioperative outcomes research. 

He is the principal investigator of the multicenter perioperative outcomes group (MPOG), a consortium of more than 30 anesthesiology and surgical departments.   He is recognized as a national leader in perioperative large dataset clinical research and has published numerous articles, editorials, and book chapters regarding intraoperative management and long term postoperative outcomes.  Using innovative techniques to integrate administrative, electronic health record, and registry data across institutions, Dr. Kheterpal has created the MPOG centralized research database, with nearly 1 million perioperative records with risk adjusted long term outcome data and detailed clinical intervention data.  Dr. Kheterpal’s current research focus is evaluating the comparative effectiveness of intraoperative anesthesiology interventions on long-term patient outcomes.

Mark Korenke, MD


#mark-korenke-md

Mark Korenke, MD


#mark-korenke-md

Mark Korenke, PHD

Resident,  Anesthesiology

307-760-6783

mkorenke@med.umich.edu

Dr. Korenke received his bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the University of Wyoming in 2003. He joined Applied Biosystems Inc. in 2003 as a software engineer within the research and development department where he focused on measurement and automation software for early-stage prototype development. He was active in projects used for genotyping, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and next-generation gene sequencing, applications that required hardware-software integration, data collection, and data processing. He left the company in 2011 to pursue his medical degree in 2011.
   
He earned his doctor of medicine degree in 2015 from Virginia Commonwealth University, after which he joined the anesthesiology department at the University of Michigan as a medical resident. He is currently in his second year of residency.
   
Dr. Korenke's professional interests include application of technology within anesthesiology and critical care, automation, data processing, and prototype development.

Michael D. Maile, M.D.


Michael D. Maile, M.D.


Michael Maile, MD

maile_photo.jpg

Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology

734-615-7679
mmaile@med.umich.edu

Dr. Maile is an Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology at the University of Michigan. He earned a BS in Biochemistry from Michigan State University and completed his medical doctorate at Penn State University.  Dr. Maile then came to the University of Michigan to complete his residency and fellowship training in anesthesiology and critical care medicine, respectively.  Afterward, he was recruited to stay in this department, accepted a position in the Division of Critical Care Medicine, and has remained ever since.

Currently, Dr. Maile is the Program Director of the Anesthesiology Critical Care Medicine Fellowship and the Associate Director of the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit.  He works clinically both as an intensivist in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit and Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit and as an anesthesiologist in the adult operating rooms. His research focuses on understanding the implications of cardiac dysfunction on patients affected by critical illness or major surgery.  Dr. Maile also has an interest in studying how changes in the concentration of various metabolites can help us understand the mechanisms causing multiple organ failure in these patients.  He hopes that, by using metabolomic and lipidomic assays capable of measuring hundreds of different compounds in a small specimen, he will be able to unravel the relevant pathophysiology and identify new strategies for improving the care of these individuals.

 

George A. Mashour, MD, PhD


George A. Mashour, MD, PhD


George A. Mashour, MD, PhD

Associate Dean, Clinical and Translational Research
Interim Director, Michigan Institute for Clinical Health Research (MICHR)
Bert N. La Du Professor, Anesthesiology, Neuroanesthesiology

734-936-4280

gmashour@umich.edu

George A. Mashour received his MD and PhD in neuroscience from Georgetown University and was awarded Fulbright Scholarships for neuroscience research at the Max Delbrück Center in Berlin and the University of Bonn. He completed his residency and chief residency in anesthesiology at the Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School and fellowship training in neurosurgical anesthesiology at the University of Michigan.

Dr. Mashour is currently the Bert N. La Du Professor and Associate Chair for Research in the Department of Anesthesiology at the University of Michigan. Mashour is also Director of the Center for Consciousness Science, Interim Director of the Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR) and Interim Associate Dean for Clinical and Translational Research. His primary clinical interest is neurosurgical anesthesiology and critical care; his scholarly interest is in the mechanisms and monitoring of consciousness.

Paul Picton, MD, MRCP, FRCA


Paul Picton, MD, MRCP, FRCA


Paul Picton, MD, MRCP, FRCA

Clinical Assistant Professor,  Anesthesiology
Director, Transplant Anesthesia
Director, Vascular Anesthesia
Chair, UMHS Transfusion Committee

734-936-4271

ppicton@umich.edu

Dr. Paul Picton is a Clinical Assistant Professor within the Department of Anesthesiology, University of Michigan.  In 1990, he received an undergraduate Honours Degree in Anatomy and Cell Biology from the University of Sheffield, UK.  Afterwards, he attended Sheffield University Medical School and received a Bachelor of Medicine and a Bachelor of Surgery in 1993.  Following internship at Sheffield University Hospitals he completed a residency in hospital medicine at Southampton University Hospitals in 1997 and obtained board certification in hospital medicine (MRCP).  He then completed a residency in anesthesiology at the Wessex School of Anaesthesia (Southampton University Hospitals) in 2006 and completed boards certification in anesthesiology (FRCA).  He was Senior Clinical Fellow in Liver Transplant and Hepatobiliary Anesthesia at the Institute of Liver Studies, Kings College Hospital, London before moving to the United States in 2006. 

He is currently a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, University of Michigan, Director of Transplant Anesthesia, Director of Vascular Anesthesia and Chair of the UMHS Transfusion Committee.

His research interests include cerebral oxygenation, cerebral injury, renal injury related to liver transplantation and the modulation of intra-operative transfusion practice.

Andrew L. Rosenberg, MD


Andrew L. Rosenberg, MD


Andrew L. Rosenberg, MD

Associate Professor, Anesthesiology
Chief Medical Information Officer

arosen@med.umich.edu

Dr. Rosenberg MD, is the Chief Medical Information Officer for the University of Michigan Health System, directs the UMHS Office of Clinical Informatics and is the Health IT Steward for the University of Michigan. Prior to this he was Director of inpatient information systems at UMHS, as well as the Chief of the Critical Care Division in the Department of Anesthesiology and the Director of the Cardiovascular Center Intensive Care Unit. He is an associate professor of Anesthesiology & Internal Medicine. He attended the Johns Hopkins Medical School where he also completed a residency in Internal Medicine. He then pursued a multi-disciplinary critical care fellowship at George Washington University where he studied with the founders of the APACHE ICU prediction systems. Dr. Rosenberg was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at the University of Michigan focusing on health-informatics, policy and health services research followed by an anesthesiology residency there as well.   Andrew’s research has focused on risk-adjustment strategies using clinically derived information as well as the use of electronic health information systems to provide clinical decision support. Dr. Rosenberg has received funding from the NIH SCCOR (Specialized Center of Clinically Oriented Research in Acute Lung Injury, as well intramural UMHS and industry-sponsored grants in a variety of critical care oriented investigations.  Andrew’s recent work in informatics has been in the areas of integrating large scale enterprise clinical electronic information systems to health system research IT capabilities, enterprise activation and optimization of electronic health and business applications, and IT governance across complex academic health systems.

Kevin K. Tremper, MD, PhD


Kevin K. Tremper, MD, PhD


Kevin K. tremper, md, phd

Robert B. Sweet Professor and Chair,  Anesthesiology

734-936-4235

ktremper@umich.edu

Dr. Tremper obtained his undergraduate degree at the University of Denver, starting as a major in Mathematics and changed to Chemical Engineering at the end of his freshman year.  After completing his BSChE at Denver he obtained a Master’s degree and a PhD in Chemical Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley.  During his PhD he became interested in the applications of engineering to physiology.  He conducted a project, which involved a mathematical model of tissue perfusion.  At the completion of this project he decided to attend medical school with a career goal of applying his engineering background to a career in academic medicine.  During medical school he conducted research on various techniques for continuously monitoring oxygenation in patients.  Dr. Tremper was granted an early three-year graduation from medical school and took a surgical internship at Harbor/UCLA Medical Center.  During this internship and a critical care research fellowship with Will Shoemaker to follow, he conducted further studies in animals and critically ill patients on various techniques for continuously monitoring oxygen and carbon dioxide.  Because of this interest in tissue oxygen measurement and oxygen monitoring, he became involved in the clinical testing of the first “artificial blood” product in 1981. 

In January of 1981 he began a residency in Anesthesiology at UCLA Medical Center.  Upon completion of his residency, he returned to the University of California, Irvine as a faculty member in the Department of Anesthesiology where he received tenure in 1984 and was appointed acting chair in 1984 and permanent chair 1985. He remained Associate Professor and Chair until 1990 when he accepted the position of Professor and Chair of the Department of Anesthesiology at the University of Michigan where he continues today. 

After approximately 15 years of research on continuous monitoring of respiratory gases, he switched his research emphasis to information systems to manage clinical data for acute perioperative care.  In the mid-1990s he initiated a co-development effort with a software company to create a perioperative information management system to be used for patient care, education, and clinical outcomes research.  This co-development partner was purchased by General Electric in 2001 and today the University of Michigan’s Department of Anesthesiology is the development site for General Electric’s perioperative software.  To date the Department of Anesthesiology’s perioperative patient database is one of the largest in the world and has resulted in a series of academic publications determining patients at risk for adverse outcomes.  These data are now being used to try to reduce the incidence of these outcomes by adjusting the perioperative care.  Starting in 2008 the department initiated a nationwide/worldwide perioperative outcomes database consortium, the Multicenter Perioperative Outcomes Group (MPOG). The department developed software which enables data from anesthesiology information management systems (AIMS) from multiple vendors to be downloaded into a common relational research database.  This organization allows data sharing from multiple institutions throughout the United States, in Europe and Israel.  Having this broad database involving all surgical procedures from a variety of institutions have enabled retrospective database queries on a grand scale for the first time.  Currently there are 35 institutions in this data sharing research consortium. 

Also starting in 2008, Dr. Tremper initiated work on the development of a new generation monitoring and alerting interface: AlertWatch®.  This readily identifiable, organ icon-based alerting system derives data from physiologic monitors, AIMS, history & physicals, and laboratory values simultaneously updated every 10 seconds.  The icons of the heart and lungs move in real-time and are color coded to designate normal, marginal, and abnormal values.  Organ icons are outlined in orange to signify co-morbidities associated with that organ.  This alerting system, which has been developed for intraoperative use, is also being developed for critical care and emergency department use.  Dr. Tremper is the Past President of the Society of Academic Anesthesiology Chairs, the Morton Society, and the Association of University Anesthesiologists.