Katsuo Kurabayashi Professor of Mechanical Engineering Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Associate Chair for Graduation Education, Mechanical Engineering katsuo@umich.edu

Katsuo Kurabayashi
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Associate Chair for Graduation Education, Mechanical Engineering
katsuo@umich.edu

What current MCIRCC projects are you working on?
My MCIRCC projects are concerned with development of a new biosensor platform that enables point-of-care (POC) biomarker-guided precision diagnosis and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI), sepsis, and other acute inflammatory disorders. My research team's approach is to achieve fast, sensitive, and sample-sparing measurement of biomarkers in serum, urine, and saliva using nanometer-scale light-matter interaction coupled with the surface binding of biomolecules called "nanoplasmonic biosensing." The ultimate goal here is to translate the biosensor platform into a fully integrated battery-operated module for use under a clinical setting with limited resources. 

How has MCIRCC and team science impacted your research goals?
As an engineering researcher, I have a professional goal to make use of cutting-edge technologies to help clinicians and clinical scientists develop powerful, effective health care techniques available at bedside. My collaboration with MCIRCC researchers is very critical to achieve this goal. My research has been tremendously benefitted from team effort with my collaborators. Clinical problems facing physicians and researchers in critical illness and injury often define my engineering research direction. Team science is the only way to allow us to solve these complex problems by gathering a wide spectrum of technical expertise all together. 

Where do you see the future of critical care research headed?
I believe that the future direction of critical care will be personalized treatment of individual patients based on precise analysis and intervention of their unique illness conditions and behaviors. Perhaps, this research area will see more engineers and computer scientists involved to collect and analyze big clinical data using advanced instrumentation engineering and artificial intelligence (AI)-based machine learning/data mining. You'll see more "techies" working with medical doctors to come up with new therapeutic techniques.  

With summer winding to a close, what are you looking forward to this upcoming fall season?
A few new PhD students interested in the MCIRCC projects will be joining my research lab this fall. They are very talented students. I look forward to working with them.