Ryan P. Barbaro, MD, MSc


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Ryan P. Barbaro, MD, MSc


PEDIATRIC & COMMUNICABLE DISEASES


ryan p. barbaro, md, msc

Clinical Lecturer, Core Faculty
Pediatrics & Communicable Diseases, Child Health Evaluation & Research (CHEAR) Unit, Critical Care Medicine

734-764-5302
barbaror@med.umich.edu

My work seeks to improve outcomes for children requiring life support technologies by encouraging the implementation of evidence-based practice. Thus far, my research has focused on a life support technology named extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). ECMO provides pulmonary and/or cardiac life support when mechanical ventilation and medical management fail or the required support is injurious. Currently, we are creating a severity of illness model for ECMO. This model will enable research to understand the structure and processes associated with improved outcomes for children requiring ECMO life support. Future research will focus on encouraging the implementation of those evidenced based processes of care. This ongoing work has been facilitated by a collaborative and maturing relationship with an international organization and registry, the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization. 

Neal Blatt, MD, PhD


Neal Blatt, MD, PhD


neal blatt, md, phd

Assistant Professor, Pediatrics & Communicable Diseases
Pediatrics-Nephrology

734-936-4210
nblatt@med.umich.edu

Dr. Blatt is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatric and Communicable Diseases at the University of Michigan. He received his undergraduate degree (Linguistics) from the University of Michigan in 1992, his medical and PhD (Chemistry) degrees from the University of Michigan in 2002, and completed a residency in General Pediatrics from the University of Chicago in 2005.  He returned to the University of Michigan community in 2005 to pursue a fellowship in Pediatric Nephrology. Upon completion of his fellowship in 2008, Dr. Blatt joined the faculty in the Department of Pediatrics and continued his development as a physician-scientist.  He is currently funded by an NIH K08 individual career development award investigating the impact of renal failure on innate and adaptive immune function.

Dr. Blatt’s clinical interests include the treatment of systemic autoimmune disease, and he is the nephrology lead for the Interdisciplinary Systemic Inflammatory Clinic that specializes in the care of these patients.  His other clinical interests include the diagnosis and treatment of complement mediated kidney diseases and acute kidney injury.  Building on his clinical interest in acute kidney injury, his research interests are currently focused at identifying the physiological impact of citrate, which is widely used as an anticoagulant for the storage of blood products and to maintain the patency of extracorporeal continuous dialysis circuits used to treat critically ill patients with renal failure. His work is centered on understanding how the diverse properties of citrate (calcium chelator, metabolic substrate) alters both monocyte inflammatory responses and lymphocyte immune responses.  

Timothy T. Cornell, MD, FAAP


Timothy T. Cornell, MD, FAAP


timothy t. cornell, md, faap

Assistant Professor,  Pediatrics & Communicable Diseases
Director Translational Research, Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Associated Program Director Pediatric Critical Care Fellowship

734-764-5302
ttcornel@med.umich.edu

Dr. Cornell is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatric and Communicable Diseases.  He received his medical degree from the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine.  He served as a resident and chief resident in Pediatrics at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C.  He joined the University of Michigan community in 2004 as a pediatric critical care fellow.  Upon completion of his fellowship Dr. Cornell joined the faculty and continued his development as a Clinician-Scientist.  He was selected as a Pediatric Critical Care Scientist Development Scholar in 2008 based on his work with regulation of signal transduction in inflammation.  He is currently funded on a K08 investigating the regulatory role of dual specific phosphatases in inflammation.

Dr. Cornell’s clinical interests include management of severe sepsis, septic shock and extracorporeal support in sepsis. His research interests are aimed at identifying cellular mechanisms that contribute to late mortality in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.  His work is centered on understanding the regulation of the immune response leading to an acquired immune suppressed state in critical illness.  The bench to bedside approach taken by Dr. Cornell has resulted in projects focusing on adapting microfluidic platforms to allow bedside immunophenotyping, the role of hematopoiesis in immunoparalysis and regulation of inflammatory signal transduction pathways by phosphatases and microRNAs.  He has twice received the Immunology Specialty Award from the Society of Critical Care Medicine.

Rodney Daniels, MD


Rodney Daniels, MD


rodney daniels, md

Assistant Professor, Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases
Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Adjunct Appointment, Biomedical Engineering

734-764-5302
drodney@med.umich.edu

Dr. Daniels is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Critical Care, who also holds an adjunct appointment in the Department of Biomedical Engineering. He is a distinguished graduate of the Virginia Military Institute where he obtained a BS in both Mechanical Engineering and Biology before pursuing a medical degree at Eastern Virginia Medical School. He completed a combined Internal Medicine/Pediatrics Residency at Albany Medical Center in Albany, NY in 2008 and went on to complete his training as a fellow in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. During fellowship, Dr. Daniels began to bring his engineering experience to the forefront, working on a variety of projects including the development of bedside, point-of-care devices for evaluation of patient data. He then joined the faculty at the Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU in Richmond, VA where he worked with VCURES (VCU Reanimation Engineering Sciences Center) as a co-leader for the critical care support division, but went on to become a member of the faculty at the University of Michigan in 2013 in order to further develop his translational engineering research. His major research interest is the development of engineering applications and devices for use in critical care, and his current work is focused on the development of a point-of-care platform to measure blood redox potential and to correlate blood/tissue redox to oxygen debt, tissue injury and adequacy of resuscitation in critical illness and injury.

Michael Gaies, MD


Michael Gaies, MD


Michael Gaies, md

Assistant Professor, Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases
 

734-936-3770

mgaies@umich.edu

Dr. Gaies is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Pediatric Cardiology and the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases. He received his Bachelor of Arts Degree from The Johns Hopkins University in 1997, followed by an MD and Masters of Public Health from Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health in 2002. He completed his pediatrics residency at Boston Children’s Hospital in 2005 and served as Chief Resident in 2005-2006. Dr. Gaies then came to the University of Michigan as a clinical fellow in Pediatric Cardiology, and after finishing spent an extra year in training as a senior fellow in pediatric cardiac critical care ending in 2010, at which time he joined the University of Michigan faculty.

Dr. Gaies’ research focuses on outcomes for children with critical cardiovascular disease cared for in the cardiac intensive care unit, specifically those who have undergone cardiac surgery. He was the Michigan site primary investigator for an NHLBI-funded, two-center randomized trial comparing tight glycemic control with standard care after pediatric cardiac surgery. In 2009, Dr. Gaies led a team of investigators from the University of Michigan funded by the NICHD/NCRR to establish an international consortium of pediatric cardiac intensive care units and develop a clinical registry as a platform to study quality and outcomes for pediatric cardiac surgical patients. He is now the Executive Director of the Pediatric Cardiac Critical Care Consortium (PC4), and is actively working with leaders of other clinical registry projects in pediatric cardiac surgery and cardiology including the STS database, ACC IMPACT registry, and the ELSO registry.

His current research interests center on defining and understanding variation in clinical outcomes and health-care resource utilization between cardiac surgery centers, and identifying the cardiac intensive care structure and process variables that drive observed variation. As a member of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy, Dr. Gaies collaborates with the team of researchers studying similar questions in adult surgical populations, and with those who direct regional and national quality improvement collaboratives.

Frank W. Moler, MD, MS


Frank W. Moler, MD, MS


frank w. moler, md, ms

Professor, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases
Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

734-764-5302
fmoler@umich.edu

Dr. Moler is Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases in the Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine.  He received his MD degree from the University of Michigan Medical School and completed his residency in Pediatrics and fellowship training in Pediatric Critical Care also at the University of Michigan. Upon completing his fellowship training, he remained on faculty at the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. Dr. Moler completed a M.S. degree in Clinical Research Design and Statistical Analysis from the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

Dr. Moler’s research interests focus on multicenter clinical research studies related to pediatric critical care medicine. Areas of current and past expertise include cardiac arrest, therapeutic hypothermia, severe cardiac and respiratory failure requiring rescue therapies, inhaled and intravenous beta 2 agonists, asthma, bronchiolitis and severity of illness outcome modeling. He is currently an active member of two federally funded pediatric clinical research networks Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) and Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network (CPCCRN)

Dr. Moler’s current research support is with NHLBI, NICHD and HRSA.   He is the overall PI of the multicenter NHLBI funded THAPCA Trials being conducted at 38 sites in the US and Canada. THAPCA is investigating the efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia for pediatric cardiac arrest by way of two separate trials in the in-hospital and out-of-hospital settings. He is also a co-PI on a NIH planning grant for an efficacy trial of therapeutic hypothermia for hyperammonemia associated with metabolic disease RCT, and a co-investigator in a NHLBI study that is investigating the pharmacokinetics of morphine and midazolam following pediatric cardiac arrest and therapeutic hypothermia.

Mike Quasney. MD, PhD


Mike Quasney. MD, PhD


mike quasney, md, phd

Fredrick Huetwell Professor, Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases
Division Director, Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

734-764-5302

mquasney@med.umich.edu

Dr. Quasney is Professor and Division Director for Pediatric Critical Care Medicine in the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases at the University of Michigan.  He received his PhD from the University of Michigan in Cellular and Molecular Biology and his MD from the University of Illinois in Chicago. After his residency in Pediatrics at Children’s Memorial Hospital associated with Northwestern University and Le Bonheur Children’s Medical Center associated with the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, he completed his fellowship training in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine.

Dr. Quasney’s research interests focus on the influence of genetic variation on the severity of lung disease in children with pneumonia and other critical illnesses.  While this work has focused on using candidate genes and pathway analysis, he has also used transcription arrays to identify novel gene products and pathways not previously thought to be involved in lung pathobiology. His current funding includes an R01 from the National Institute of Health examining serum biomarkers and genetic variations as markers of more severe disease in critically ill children.

Rebecca Vartanian, MD


Rebecca Vartanian, MD


rebecca vartanian, md

Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases

734-763-4109
rebeccav@med.umich.edu

Dr. Vartanian is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine within the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases at the University of Michigan.  She received her medical degree from Wayne State University School of Medicine and completed her Pediatrics and Neonatology training at the University of Michigan.  Dr. Vartanian joined the faculty in 2010. Dr. Vartanian oversees and facilitates the quality improvement initiatives in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit, including multi-center collaborations within the Vermont Oxford Network and the State of Michigan Quality Initiative. Her clinical interests include oxygen management in premature infants, optimization of neonatal nutrition, and the care of extremely low birth weight infants.