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The Critical Care Challenge


Why critical care?

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The Critical Care Challenge


Why critical care?

Our Passion:

many. We want to shine the light on critical care so that we can find new and innovative ways to monitor, diagnose and treat critically ill and injured patients.

Critical illness and injury is the silent epidemic that affects more than 5.7 million Americans every year. It has an enormous societal and economic toll, yet it is not well understood by

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Research Portfolio


Our research spans the major areas of critical care for maximum impact

Research Portfolio


Our research spans the major areas of critical care for maximum impact

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Neurologic

Acute neurologic injuries in the brain and spinal cord are amongst the hardest injuries to treat. Even when they aren’t fatal, the ability to recover is limited. Each year in the United States, an estimated 1.7 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury, 795,000 suffer a stroke and 17,000 sustain a spinal cord injury. That’s why we’re developing diagnostics, monitors and therapeutics for patients who suffer acute neurologic catastrophes such as traumatic brain injury, hemorrhagic stoke, and acute spinal cord injury.


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Sepsis

This severe inflammatory response to infection can lead to multiple organ failure, resulting in permanent disability or death. Affecting more than one million patients a year, sepsis is one of the top 10 causes of death in the United States. Our research aims to enhance the pathophysiologic understanding of sepsis to develop new technologies for ultra-early diagnosis and therapeutic guidance.


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Cardiac

Each year in the United States, approximately 325,000 sudden cardiac arrests occur outside the hospital, with a survival rate of only 12%. Our comprehensive approach to understanding the pathophysiology of cardiac arrest and cardiogenic shock guides our development of next generation diagnostic tools and therapeutics.


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TRAUMA & Combat Casualty Care

Trauma is the leading cause of death in the United States between the ages of 1 and 46, accounting for 41 million ER visits each year. Trauma patients often require resuscitation, surgery, bleeding control, and infection treatment. That care is made even more difficult on the battlefield, where the most critical phase of care is the period from the time of injury until arrival at a medical treatment facility. Our goal is to develop new technologies for the civilian setting and then tailor them for use by military medical personnel.


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UNIVERSAL SUPPORTIVE CRITICAL CARE

Patients can become critically ill from a wide variety of insults and injuries; from major trauma or overwhelming infection, to cardiac arrest or premature birth. Despite their diversity, there are many commonalities in caring for such patients. Our goal is to leverage innovative research in one critical area and apply it to others.

INNOVATION PORTFOLIO


Critical care research projects

INNOVATION PORTFOLIO


Critical care research projects