Mahshid Abir, MD, MSc


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Mahshid Abir, MD, MSc


EMERGENCY MEDICINE


mahshid abir, md, msc

Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine

734-763-9707
mahshida@med.umich.edu

Dr. Abir is an emergency medicine physician and health services researcher with a joint appointment at the University of Michigan (U-M) and the RAND Corporation. Clinically, Dr. Abir staffs the emergency department at the University of Michigan Health System.  Dr. Abir joined the U-M Department of Emergency Medicine faculty after two years in Washington, DC, where she was faculty at the George Washington University Department of Emergency Medicine, and worked as a health services researcher at RAND’s office in Arlington, VA.  She was a fellow in the University of Michigan Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars program where she earned a master’s degree in Health and Health Services Research. Dr. Abir’s research focus is in areas pertinent to improving healthcare systems efficiency and outcomes, measuring and optimizing daily and catastrophic health system surge capacity, evaluating emergency department and inpatient workflow efficiency and outcomes, and transitions of care.   

Sardar Ansari, PhD


Sardar Ansari, PhD


Sardar Ansari, phd

Research Fellow, Emergency Medicine

734-647-7259
sardara@umich.edu

Sardar Ansari earned his Ph.D. in Computer Science and his M.S. degree in Statistics at Virginia Commonwealth University in December 2013. He received his bachelor’s degree in Software Engineering from University of Tehran, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department in 2008, and his M.S. in Computer Science from VCU in 2010. He is currently a research fellow at University of Michigan Emergency Medicine Department and he is a member of Michigan Center for Integrative Research in Critical Care (MCIRCC). Dr. Ansari's research interests are signal and image processing, machine learning and data mining as well as non-linear and discrete optimization and queuing theory.

William Barsan, MD


William Barsan, MD


william barsan, md

Professor, Emergency Medicine
Principal Investigator, Neurologic Emergency Treatment Trials Clinical Coordinating Center

734-232-2141
wbarsan@umich.edu

William Barsan is Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Michigan.  His academic focus is translational research in stroke and other neurological emergencies.  He is currently principal investigator of the Clinical Coordinating Center for the Neurological Emergencies Treatment Trials Network (NETT).  This is a large cooperative award from the NINDS/NIH encompassing 22 academic sites across the country to conduct clinical trials in neurological emergencies.  Dr. Barsan also has interest and expertise in adaptive clinical trials.  He has been co-PI of the ADAPT-IT project funded by NIH and FDA to help advance regulatory science through the use of innovative adaptive clinical trials. 

Dr. Barsan came to the University of Michigan in 1992, as the Section Chief for Emergency Medicine within the Department of Surgery.  Prior to joining the UM, he was faculty at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.  While in Cincinnati, Dr. Barsan was a founding member of the Greater Cincinnati Northern Kentucky Stroke Team and has been involved in stroke clinical trials since 1983.   He led the development of an Emergency Medicine Residency at the University of Michigan and spear-headed the creation of the Department of Emergency Medicine within the medical school in 1999.  He has served as president of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine and the Association for Academic Chairs of Emergency Medicine.  Dr Barsan served 8 years on the Board of Directors of the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) and was President of ABEM from 1998-99.  He was elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences Institute of Medicine in 2003. 

Benjamin Bassin, MD


Benjamin Bassin, MD


Benjamin Bassin, MD

bassin_benjamin.jpg

Director of Clinical Operations, Emergency Critical Care Center (EC3)
Associate Medical Director, Critical Care Transport/Survival Flight
Associate Service Chief, Adult Emergency Services
Clinical Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine

 734- 232-0510
bsbassin@med.umich.edu

Dr. Bassin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine. He received a B.S. in Movement Science and Physiology from the University of Michigan in 1998 and his Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Michigan Medical School in 2005. He completed residency training in Emergency Medicine at the University of Cincinnati where he served as Chief Resident. Dr. Bassin returned to the University of Michigan in 2009 as faculty in the Department of Emergency Medicine.

 His academic interests include improving the quality, delivery and standardization of care to critically ill patients, advanced airway interventions, and the integration of design and design thinking into the clinical arena as it applies to the built environment, device design and overall workflow and process integration. He has a keen interest in innovation and entrepreneurship and is one of only a few physicians in the United States to hold the Evidenced Based Design Accreditation and Certification (EDAC) from the Center for Healthcare Design and lectures both nationally and internationally on the subject of lean healthcare and facility design.

 He was an integral part of the planning, design and implementation of the first and largest ED-based ICU in the country, the U-M Emergency Critical Care Center (EC3) where he currently serves as the EC3 Director of Clinical Operations. He is also the Associate Medical Director for Critical Care Transport/ Survival Flight and the Associate Service Chief for the Department of Emergency Medicine. In these roles, he has an established track record of innovation and administrative leadership in process improvement, quality assurance, risk mitigation, and throughput optimization utilizing lean-based strategies.

Michael Cover, MD


Michael Cover, MD


Michael Cover, MD

cover_2.jpg

Clinical Lecturer, Emergency Medicine
 

734-232-6166
coverm@med.umich.edu

Michael Cover, MD is a clinical lecturer in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Michigan. He received his BS in Biology from Emory University in 2009 and his MD from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in 2013. He completed his residency in Emergency Medicine at University of Michigan/St Joseph Mercy Hospitals in 2017. He is currently an Emergency Ultrasound Fellow at University of Michigan.

Colin Greineder, MD


Colin Greineder, MD


Colin Greineder, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor,  Emergency Medicine
Assistant Professor,  Pharmacology

734-647-0187
coling@med.umich.edu

Dr. Greineder attended the Yale School of Medicine, graduating in 2003, and then completed the UMHS/SJMH Emergency Medicine residency program. In 2008, Dr. Greineder moved to the University of Pennsylvania to begin a PhD in Pharmacology, while working as an attending in the Emergency Department. Following the completion of his PhD in 2013, Dr. Greineder began a post-doctoral fellowship in the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, during which time he was awarded at K08 Career Development grant from the NHLBI. Dr. Greineder joined the University of Michigan in July of 2018 as an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Pharmacology. His laboratory focuses on the development of novel technologies for targeted delivery of biotherapeutics and drug carriers to the vascular endothelium, with the overarching hypothesis that intervention at the endothelial cell can improve disease outcomes in a variety of emergent and critical illnesses. His laboratory is located within the BioInterfaces Institute at the North Campus Research Complex.

Kyle J. Gunnerson, MD


Kyle J. Gunnerson, MD


Kyle j. gunnerson, md

Associate Professor,  Emergency Medicine
Chief, Division of Emergency Critical Care

734-7647-9256
kgunners@umich.edu

Dr. Gunnerson is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Emergency Medicine, Anesthesiology, and Internal Medicine.  He received a B.S. degree in Chemistry and Biology from Kansas Wesleyan University in 1992 and his degree in medicine from the University of Kansas School of Medicine in 1996. Dr. Gunnerson trained in the combined Emergency Medicine/Internal Medicine program at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI.  This was followed by fellowship training in the Multidisciplinary Critical Care Training Program at the University of Pittsburgh.  Prior to his arrival at the University of Michigan in 2013, Dr. Gunnerson was an Associate Professor in the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Anesthesiology at Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center (VCUMC) in Richmond, VA.  Dr. Gunnerson departed VCUMC as the Division Chief of Critical Care in the Department of Anesthesiology, Associate Director of the Center for Adult Critical Care, Medical Director of the Cardiac Surgery ICU, and the Medical Director for the ECMO program.

Dr. Gunnerson’s research interests include a wide range of critical illness, specifically on early identification and resuscitation of patients in shock or at risk for developing subsequent organ dysfunction.  Dr. Gunnerson’s research includes several large collaborative projects funded by both industry and governmental funding agencies.  These have ranged from the discovery and development of novel biomarkers in critical illness, treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock and in the development of non-invasive technology used for the identification and treatment of patients with critical illness and injury. Dr. Gunnerson is the current Chief on the newly formed Division of Critical Care in the UM Department of Emergency Medicine.  This is one of a small number of Critical Care Divisions within a Department of Emergency Medicine and will focus on a tripartite mission of delivering quality, contemporary critical care; educating residents, fellows and students in acute critical care; and collaborating with a diverse range of investigators on innovative critical illness and injury research projects.  This mission will be enhanced by the development of a dedicated Emergency Critical Care Unit with the cooperation and integration of the adult inpatient ICUs.  In alignment with the newly approved American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) critical care fellowship training pathway, a formal critical care fellowship for Emergency Medicine residency graduates is currently under development with the collaboration of the Division of Pulmonary/Critical Care.  Dr. Gunnerson has been very active in the growth of the speciality of Emergency Critical Care.  He is involved in numerous research, educational, and national workforce projects and is a current member of the American Board of Internal Medicine Critical Care Subspecialty Committee.

David Hackenson, MD


David Hackenson, MD


David hackenson, md

Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine

734-615-2765
dhackens@med.umich.edu

Dr. Hackenson is a graduate of the California Institute of Technology, and holds a BS in Engineering and Applied Science. He worked outside of medicine for several years, most recently for Boeing as a systems engineer for communication spacecraft. He has experience in manufacturing and assembly, CNC machining, CAD, and fault tolerant system design. He made the transition to medicine to do more to help others, and to bring engineering insight and solutions to bear on medical problems. He completed his medical degree at Wayne State University, a three year residency in Emergency Medicine at Indiana University, and a two year fellowship in Critical Care Medicine at Indiana University. He practices in the University Hospital Emergency Department and Emergency Critical Care Center (EC3). He has a strong interest in medical device development, and leveraging technology to anticipate and solve technical medical problems. 

Adrianne Haggins, MD


Adrianne Haggins, MD


adrianne haggins, md

Clinical Lecturer, Emergency Medicine

734-615-2765
ahaggins@med.umich.edu

Dr. Adrianne Haggins is a clinical lecturer in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Michigan.  She received her undergraduate degree in psychology from the University of Michigan in 2001, and M.D. from Michigan State University College of Human Medicine in 2007.  After which, she completed Emergency Medicine residency training at the University of Chicago in 2010.

Her primary research focus on improving the delivery of emergency care services and reducing racial disparities in access to alternative outpatient care in ways that promote long‐term population health. This research interest is deeply rooted in her experience growing up in Detroit, MI, practicing as a medical student in Flint, MI and her clinical training on the south side of Chicago.  After residency, she sought out additional research training through the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program at the University of Michigan (2010-2012), where she obtained a Masters in Health and Healthcare Research.

Her primary research interests focus on developing an understanding of how prior and future healthcare reform affects use of ambulatory care services, primarily in the emergency department, as well as other outpatient settings.  She anticipates that this will be informative in better understanding persistent barriers in access to health care, which are not addressed by insurance coverage alone, particularly among minority populations.   

Another major area of interest is in developing a better understanding of “Why patient’s come to the ER?” She seeks to understand via survey research patient decision‐making in seeking care in the emergency department versus alternative settings, and whether the decision-making varies by demographic factors, such as race.  She anticipates that by developing a better understanding of utilization trends and patient expectations/preferences, that this can lead to informed interventions to improve use of emergency and outpatient services in the years ahead.

Cindy Hsu, MD, PhD


Cindy Hsu, MD, PhD


Cindy Hsu, md, PhD

Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine
Assistant Professor, Acute Care Surgery

734-764-3691
 hcindy@umich.edu

Dr. Hsu holds joint appointments in the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Acute Care Surgery. She is board-certified in emergency medicine and surgical critical care, having recently completed her trauma/surgical critical care fellowship at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center. Currently, Dr. Hsu attends in the Emergency Critical Care Center, Emergency Department, and Trauma Burn Intensive Care Unit.

Dr. Hsu has broad background in basic science and clinical research with a doctoral training in pharmacology & experimental therapeutics and biomedical neuroscience. Her research interests center on neuroprotection post-cardiac arrest and traumatic brain injury, point-of-care ultrasound, and asynchronous medical education. She is also the co-principal investigator of an Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST) multicenter study that examines the role of targeted temperature management in hanging-induced cardiac arrest.

Henry Jewell


Henry Jewell


Henry Jewell

profile_pic1.jpg

Assistant Director of Development, Emergency Medicine

734-763-0872

jewellhe@umich.edu

After completing both a bachelor’s degree in marine geography from the University of Wales Cardiff and a masters’ degree in geography from George Washington University, Henry has over 12 years of experience in organizational management, strategic planning, and community engagement in non-profit and academic environments. Previously Henry was with the World Bank as a geospatial analyst where he was engaged in international policy dialogue and directed investment priorities through urbanization. Most recently, he was the Executive Director of Akvo Foundation, where he was responsible for leading a team to create increased efficiency and transparency to improve services for the management of water, sanitation, agriculture, health, energy, education and the environment for disadvantaged populations around the globe. As part of his role, he lead development efforts to procure millions of dollars in grants from multiple funding sources  as well as developing contractual partnerships.

Tulasi Ram Jinka, DVM, PhD


Tulasi Ram Jinka, DVM, PhD


tulasi ram jinka, dvm, phd

Research Investigator, Emergency Medicine

734-764-3693
tjinka@umich.edu

Dr. Jinka’s research interest is to investigate the mechanisms of brain injury caused by cardiac arrest and neuroprotective strategies including targeted temperature management. Cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the USA. Post-cardiac arrest therapeutic hypothermia is the only neuroprotective strategy proven clinically effective after any form of ischemic brain injury. Inadequate understanding of its neuroprotective mechanisms remains a fundamental barrier to optimizing implementation and patient outcomes.

Dr. Jinka’s research investigates the mechanisms of neuroprotection in drug-induced targeted temperature management, determines optimal duration of targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest and compares drug-induced targeted temperature management over external cooling after cardiac arrest. The overall objective of the research project is mechanistic optimization of post-cardiac arrest therapeutic hypothermia.

Justin Jones


Justin Jones


Justin Jones

Research Manager, Emergency Medicine

734-936-0855
jcjones@umich.edu 

Justin has worked at the University of Michigan since 2001 in several capacities ranging from Lab Animal Medicine to Endocrinology and now Emergency Medicine. He has worked in a management role since 2007 and is currently a Research Manager for Emergency Medicine at NCRC. He works with both clinical and laboratory research providing management and support of day to day operations for multiple research teams within Emergency Medicine. He earned his BS in Zoology from Michigan State University and his MS from Eastern Michigan University in Clinical Research Administration.

Ross Kessler, MD


Ross Kessler, MD


Ross Kessler, md

Clinical Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine

609-705-6257
rokessle@med.umich.edu

Dr. Kessler is the Co-Director of Clinical Ultrasound and the Associate Director of the Clinical Ultrasound Fellowship in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Michigan. Dr. Kessler is a graduate of the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. He completed residency at the University of Pennsylvania and an emergency ultrasound fellowship at Denver Health Medical Center. Dr. Kessler has a specific interest in the utilization of ultrasound in critical care, the development of automated clinical ultrasound technology, and the integration of ultrasound in medical education. He is the director of the critical care ultrasound curriculum for the aeromedical transport program at the University of Michigan and co-director of the ultrasound curriculum within the medical school. He is co-chair of the American College of Emergency Physicians critical care ultrasound subcommittee.

Daniel Keyes, MD


Daniel Keyes, MD


daniel keyes, md

Associate Chair for Academic Affairs, Emergency Medicine
St. Joseph Mercy Health System

 keyesdc@trinity-academichealth.org

Dr. Keyes is Associate Chair for Academic Affairs in the Department Of Emergency Medicine, St Joseph Mercy Health System, Ann Arbor, and serves as faculty for the University of Michigan Emergency Medicine Residency Program.  He is board certified in Internal Medicine (IM), Emergency Medicine (EM) and Medical Toxicology.  He graduated from the UCLA School of Medicine, completed residencies in Internal Medicine and  Emergency Medicine at the UCLA. He completed a Masters of Public Health (MPH) at Harvard University before becoming full-time EM faculty at the University of Texas, Southwestern Medical (UTSW) Center in Dallas. At UTSW he was Associate Professor and Chief of the Section of Medical Toxicology, serving as the Medical Director of the North Texas Poison Center for 10 years. He founded and served as Program Director for the Medical Toxicology Training Program at UT Southwestern Medical Center, which continues to be active in research and training.  After serving as a faculty Fulbright Scholar at the Technion University, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine in Israel, he came to Michigan in 2009 to serve in his current capacity.

Dr. Keyes' clinical research interests are in the area of geriatrics including use of the emergency department by seniors, geriatric depression, venous thromboembolism (VTE), and medical toxicology.  Dr. Keyes has authored and co-authored numerous publications in medical toxicolgy  VTE; and related fields. He served as the Editor-in-Chief for the book, "Medical Response to Terrorism: Preparedness and Clinical Practice" (Lippincott). Dr. Keyes serves as the Research Director for the Emergency Medicine Research Unit at the St Joseph Mercy Hospital System, Ann Arbor.  He is also interested in faculty development, and engagement of community hospital - university training program physicians with scholarly activity including clinical research.  He serves on various committees of the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine and has developed and presented several didactic sessions for this national academic organization.  He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, the American College of Emergency Physicians and the American College of Medical Toxicology.

The SJMHS, Ann Arbor Emergency Medicine Research Unit includes two experienced clinical research coordinator RNs and an extensive supportive staff with the ability to support a wide variety of federally-funded and investigator-initiated research projects. As part of this research unit, Dr. Keyes and colleagues established the  Emergency Medicine Research Associates Program (EMRAP) in 2010.  This program provides motivated, highly selected and prepared undergraduate university students to work in a variety of hospital settings, both inside and outside of the Emergency Room, to enroll patients in clinical research studies.  Participants in this program have had opportunities to collaborate with scientific publication, and many participates have been able to go on to study in medical school. This team of research associates complement a fully-featured research program which is able provide excellent support for a wide array of clinical research projects, whether intramural or across multiple research sites.

Dr. Keyes enjoys hiking, kayaking and sailing along with his wife and three children.

Frederick K. Korley, MD, PhD


Frederick K. Korley, MD, PhD


frederick k. korley, md, phd

Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine

734-647-0261
korley@umich.edu

Frederick Korley MD, PhD is an Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine. He completed his medical school education and residency training in emergency medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Dr. Korley was selected chief resident during his final year of residency training. He joined the Johns Hopkins faculty in 2007 as the inaugural recipient of Robert E. Meyerhoff Endowed Professorship. He subsequently completed a doctoral degree in clinical investigation at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health with election to Phi Beta Kappa.

Dr. Korley's research activities involve translation of novel diagnostics to inform clinically rational, timely, and cost-effective diagnosis of cardiac and brain injury in the emergency department. The goal of his traumatic brain injury work is to improve the acute care diagnosis, risk-stratification and treatment of TBI by identifying distinct molecular subtypes of TBI that will allow for targeted treatment and improved outcomes. The central hypothesis of this work is that a data-driven, multi-disciplinary approach utilizing novel methods (proteomics, genomics, connectomics, advanced imaging) for characterizing patient and injury characteristics will enable a precise and personalized approach to delivering the right treatment to the right TBI patient at the right time. He is an inventor on a patent for a panel of novel traumatic brain injury biomarkers.

Dr. Korley is the recipient of numerous clinical and research awards including: The Johns Hopkins Clinical Scholars Award (2010 – 2012); Department of Emergency Medicine Teacher of the Year Award (2010); Department of Emergency Medicine Attending of the Year Award (2011); Johns Hopkins Clinician Scientist Award (2012 – 2014) and the Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Award sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (2015 – 2019).

Steven Kronick, MD, MS


Steven Kronick, MD, MS


steven kronick, md, ms

Associate Professor,  Emergency Medicine
Service Chief, Adult Emergency Medicine

734-763-9849
skronick@umich.edu

Steven Kronick is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Michigan.  He is service chief for the Adult Emergency Department.  He received his A.B. from Dartmouth College in 1982 in Anthropology. His medical training was at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston in 1986.  He completed a residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan in 1989 and one in Emergency Medicine at the Henry Ford Hospital in 1997.  He has a masters degree in Clinical Research and Statistical Analysis from the University of Michigan (1993).  He chairs the UMHS CPR Committee.  Dr. Kronick's research interests are in emergency department operations and cardiac arrest in the hospitalized patient. 

 

Mark Lowell, MD


Mark Lowell, MD


Mark Lowell, md

Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine
Director, Survival Flight

734-615-2766
mlowell@med.umich.edu

Dr. Lowell is an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Michigan.  He received his bachelor’s degrees in Biophysics from Tulane University in 1982.  He graduated from the New York University School of Medicine in 1986, and completed a residency in Internal Medicine at the Emory University Affiliated Hospital in 1989, and completed his Emergency Medicine residency at The University of Cincinnati in 1992.  Upon completion of his residency, he became one of the original faculty members of the newly created Section of Emergency Medicine (now Department of Emergency Medicine) at The University of Michigan. 

Dr. Lowell’s main interests are in critical care transport and acute cardiovascular care.  He is the Medical Director of Survival Flight, which is the critical care transport program at The University of Michigan Health System.  Operating a fleet of two helicopters and one fixed wing airplane, it is the busiest air medical transport program in the region, with the capabilities to transport patients of all ages with diverse medical conditions, including acute lung injury, ECMO, left ventricular assist devices, intra-aortic balloon pumps, etc.

Prashant Mahajan, MD, MPH, MBA


Prashant Mahajan, MD, MPH, MBA


Prashant Mahajan, MD, MPH, MBA

Professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine
Vice- Chair, Emergency Medicine
Division Chief, Pediatric Emergency Medicine
CS Mott Children's Hospital of Michigan

734-763-9849

pmahajan@umich.edu

Prashant Mahajan, MD, MPH, MBA recently joined U-M and was named Vice-Chair of Emergency Medicine and Division Chief of Pediatric Emergency Medicine.  Dr. Mahajan came from Wayne State University and the Children’s Hospital of Michigan where he held the position of Professor of Emergency Medicine and Pediatrics, and Division Chief of Emergency Medicine in the Carman & Ann Adams Department of Pediatrics. He was also Medical Director for the Children’s Research Center of Michigan and Director for the Center for Quality and Innovation at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan. Nationally, Dr. Mahajan Chairs the Executive Committee overseeing the Emergency Medicine Section of the American Academy of Pediatrics. 

Dr. Mahajan received his MD at the University of Bombay, India and completed his EM residency and fellowship at Children’s Hospital of Michigan. He received his MPH from the University of Michigan and his MBA from the University of Massachusetts. Dr. Mahajan is a founding member of the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) and has an impressive track record of research publications, federal research funding, and mentorship of junior investigators.  His current NIH R01 grant focuses on the innovative use of RNA biosignatures in the management of febrile infants.   

His work has been focused on identifying novel diagnostic approaches to the investigation of bacterial and non-bacterial infections in the emergency setting. Fever is a common, yet, non-specific sign for infection, especially in the very young (≤ 60 days of age) infants and current methods of evaluation (clinical examination, routine laboratory tests, including cultures of relevant tissue fluids) are sub-optimal in their ability to identify pathogens by type and species. His research has focused on the use of host RNA expression profiles as a novel and alternate way to identify infection in febrile infants who present to the ED. Over the past 15 years, he has led a multidisciplinary team of investigators with expertise in emergency medicine, infectious diseases, immunology, genomics and bioinformatics to develop novel tools to change the paradigm in the evaluation of febrile illnesses. He has been serially funded by NIH to define RNA biosignatures, a paradigm shifting methodology that will have reliable performance characteristics to eventually replace cultures as the reference standard for diagnosis of infections. He is using similar bioinformatics tools to study sepsis and pneumonia in children.    

Clinical decision-making is a highly complex cognitive process which is susceptible to errors, in part due to the inherent uncertainty of the diagnostic process. The working environment of an ED is unique, dynamic, and especially challenging to make accurate and timely diagnoses. Decisions are made under substantial time constraints, and often with inadequate information involving illnesses that are of varying severity or have incompletely evolved to allow for diagnostic certainty. Dr. Mahajan’s research focuses on errors in decision making in the context of quality of care for children in the inpatient and outpatient setting and understanding the impact of systems and processes that preclude us from delivering high quality care.  He has been involved in developing evidence-based and data-driven solutions that leverages existing EMR technology to address important clinical issues such as pediatric sepsis and variation in the care of conditions such as asthma, epilepsy.


Pediatric trauma is one of the most important causes of pediatric death and morbidity. Dr. Mahajan has been involved in the development of parsimonious and clinically meaningful decision rules that can be applied at the patient bedside in the evaluation of a child with blunt head injury, traumatic abdominal injury and injury to the cervical spine.


 A substantial portion of his research has been involved in evaluating the impact of healthcare delivery in the pediatric emergency setting related to costs, program evaluation and studying the impact of specific health conditions. 

Ronald F. Maio, DO, MS


Ronald F. Maio, DO, MS


ronald f. maio, do, ms

Director, Office of Human Research Compliance Review (OHRCR)
Office of the Vice President for Research (OVPR)
Professor,  Emergency Medicine

734-647-0489
ronmaio@umich.edu

Dr. Maio is Professor Emeritus in Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School. He has also served as an assistant Dean in Research Regulatory Affairs for the Medical School and as Director of the Office of Human Research Compliance Review, Office of the Vice-President for Research, University of Michigan.  His primary areas of research interest have been in the treatment and prevention of injuries in adults and adolescents and also the effectiveness of EMS systems.  He has a particular interest in the relationship of alcohol and other drugs to injury and also the application of non-mortality outcome measures to EMS research and evaluation. Dr. Maio is a former and founding PI of the Great Lakes Node of the federally funded Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN).  He also was the PI of the NHTSA funded Emergency Medical Systems Outcomes Project (EMSOP) and founded and was the former Director of the University of Michigan Injury Research Center, then housed in the Department of Emergency Medicine.

Brandon McNaughton, PhD


Brandon McNaughton, PhD


brandon mcnaughton, phd

Research Scientist, Emergency Medicine

734-763-9387
bmcnaugh@umich.edu

As a tech entrepreneur, scientist and inventor, Dr. McNaughton has devoted his career to adding value to early-stage technology development and startup companies. He has founded two high-tech startups—serving as CTO at the venture capital-backed diagnostic company, Life Magnetics, Inc. Life Magnetics was founded to commercialize a novel biosensor product that was spun out of the University of Michigan.

Dr. McNaughton’s research interests are focused on developing new technologies for life science and in vitro diagnostics applications.This includes magnetic particle synthesis, fabrication, dynamics, and applications; development and application of biosensors; and innovation/technology development principles and good practices.

He currently works as an Entrepreneur in Residence with Detroit Innovate, which is an early stage venture capital fund at Invest Detroit and is an Adjunct Assistant Research Scientist at the UM Department of Emergency Medicine. Additionally, he teaches Entrepreneurship for the UM Center for Entrepreneurship.

Dr. McNaughton received his BS in Physics from California State University-Bakersfield in 2002 and his PhD in Applied Physics from UM in 2007. He then worked at the UM Department of Physics as a research fellow from 2008-2009, followed by assistant research scientist in Biomedical Engineering, where he was also a translational research scholar until 2010. In previous roles, he has formed and led interdisciplinary teams, ranging from clinicians to scientists, to accomplish award-winning research and value-added milestones for technology development.

Richard P. Medlin, Jr, MD, MSIS


Richard P. Medlin, Jr, MD, MSIS


Richard p. medlin, jr., md, msis

Clinical Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine

734-615-2765
medlin@umich.edu

Dr. Medlin is the Associate Chief Medical Information Officer for Acute Care Services at the University of Michigan and a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine. He received his Biochemistry Degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) and his medical degree from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. He is dual boarded in both Emergency Medicine and Clinical Informatics, having completed an Emergency Medicine residency at Carolinas Medical Center, a research fellowship at Carolinas Medical Center, a Clinical Informatics Fellowship at University of North Carolina and a Masters in Information Science at the University of North Carolina School of Information and Library Science.

He is currently collaborating with MCIRCC on its Analytic for Hemodynamic Instability, which uses real-time analytics to predict impending cardiovascular instability in critically ill patients.

Other active projects include biosurveillance systems and systems using clinical text data mining.

William Meurer, MD, MS


William Meurer, MD, MS


william meurer, md, ms

Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine
Associate Professor, Neurology

734-615-2766
wmeurer@umich.edu

Dr. Meurer is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Neurology. He received his B.A. degree in Chemistry from the Ohio State University in 1999 and then attended the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine where he received his MD in 2003. Dr. Meurer trained in emergency medicine at the MetroHealth / Cleveland Clinic Combined residency and served as chief resident, graduating in 2006. He started at Michigan in 2006 as a fellow in Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease under the direction of Lewis Morgenstern and the University of Michigan Stroke Program. During this fellowship, he also studied clinical research design and statistical analysis and received his M.S. from the University of Michigan School of Public Health through the On Job / On Campus program in the Department of Biostatistics. Since the completion of his fellowship he has been on the faculty at the University of Michigan Medical School. Dr. Meurer’s research interests focus on two major areas: the early care of patients with acute neurological illness and injury (especially stroke) and the incorporation of innovative and adaptive clinical trial designs to improve the efficiency and yield of the discovery process. He is a co-investigator in the Neurological Emergencies Treatment Trials (NETT) Network, funded by the NIH to conduct large-scale clinical trials of interventions delivered in the field or in the ED. He also works on the Adaptive Designs Advancing Promising Trials Into Treatment (ADAPT-IT) project with Bill Barsan. In collaboration with partners from Berry Consultants and the Medical University of South Carolina, the ADAPT-IT project has developed 5 innovative adaptive trial designs for spinal cord injury, status epilepticus, stroke(2), and hypoxic encephalopathy following cardiac arrest. He also collaborates extensively with Kevin Kerber on the diagnosis and treatment of ED dizziness presentations (recently served as co-I on AHRQ project, and currently working as co-I on an NIH funded study to improve the use of repositioning maneuvers positional vertigo.) In addition, Dr. Meurer served as the local Principal Investigator on the CLEAR-ER stroke reperfusion trial and as a co-investigator on several other current and completed stroke trials. Nationally, he is the immediate past chair of the Neurological Emergencies Interest Group of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. Currently, Dr. Meurer is the Emergency Medicine physician lead on the Stroke Arrival group and Comprehensive Stroke Center initiatives: with a shared mission between both groups to improve and standardize the acute care of patients with stroke. He was a co-investigator on Phillip Scott’s cluster randomized trial INSTINCT, where we studied the process of delivering acute stroke treatment in community hospitals without direct physical access to stroke teams. Dr. Meurer is extremely excited about the possibilities of M-CIRCC as it is a natural avenue for collaboration and work in many of areas of intersection between ED critical care and improving the outcomes of patients with time-sensitive neurological emergencies. 

Kayvan Najarian, PhD


Kayvan Najarian, PhD


kayvan najarian, phd

Director, MCIRCC Data Science, Emergency Medicine
Professor,  Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics
Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Professor, Emergency Medicine

734-763-3924
kayvan@med.umich.edu

Dr. Kayvan Najarian is a  Professor at departments of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, and Emergency Medicine at the University of Michigan. He also serves as the director of MCIRRC Biosignal Image and Computational (BIC) Core program. Dr. Najarian received his Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from University of British Columbia, Canada, M.Sc in Biomedical Engineering from Amirkabir University, Iran, and B.Sc. in Electrical Engineering from Sharif University, Iran. The focus of Dr. Kayvan Najarian’s research is on the design of signal/image processing and machine learning methods to create computer-assisted clinical decision support systems that improve patient care and reduce the costs of healthcare. Dr. Najarian’s lab also designs sensors to collect and analyze physiological signals and images. In particular, Dr. Najarian’s research focuses on creating decision support systems to manage traumatic brain injuries, traumatic pelvic/abdominal injuries and hemorrhagic shock, cardiac arrest and other critical care states. Dr. Najarian’s research has been funded by agencies such as National Science Foundation and Department of Defense.  He serves as the Editor-in-Chief of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology and the Associate Editor of two other journals in the field of biomedical informatics. He is also a member of the editorial board of many other journals and serves as the guest editor of special issues for several journals in the field. Dr. Najarian has over 150 peer-reviewed journal and conference publications including a highly referenced textbook in the field of biomedical signal and image processing.  

Robert Neumar, MD, PhD


Robert Neumar, MD, PhD


robert w. neumar, md, phd

Professor and Chair, Emergency Medicine

734-936-6020
neumar@med.umich.edu

Robert W. Neumar, MD, PhD is Professor and Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Michigan.  He is board certified by the American Board of Emergency Medicine and a Fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians.  Dr. Neumar received his BS degree in 1985 from Juniata College (Pennsylvania) and his MD degree in 1990 from the University of Pittsburg School of Medicine.  He received his PhD in Physiology in 1996 from Wayne State University. Dr. Neumar’s formal research training includes a Sarnoff Fellowship at Ohio State University, a Critical Care Research Fellowship under the direction Peter Safar at the University of Pittsburgh Resuscitation Research Center, and an Emergency Medicine Research Fellowship at Wayne State University under the direction of Dr. Blaine White.

Dr. Neumar was appointed Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Michigan in 2012.  He currently serves as Chair of the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and as an AHA delegate to the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR).

Dr. Neumar’s research is focused on the molecular mechanisms of neuronal injury after cardiac arrest and traumatic brain injury.  His work has helped elucidate the role of calpain and caspase proteolytic cascades in post-ischemic neuronal death.  He has also helped define the pathophysiology of post-cardiac arrest syndrome, and is investigating strategies to optimize brain recovery after cardiac arrest including therapeutic hypothermia.  Since arriving at the University of Michigan, Dr. Neumar has partnered with Dr. Robert Bartlett in the Department of Surgery to investigate novel strategies for treating cardiac arrest using extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR).  Dr. Neumar’s research has been funded through the NIH, American Heart Association, private foundation grants, and industry.  Both emergency medicine research fellows and neuroscience graduate students have trained in Dr. Neumar's laboratory. Dr. Neumar is the recipient of numerous awards throughout his career including the Peter Sarfar Award for Excellence in Graduate Research from the University of Pittsburgh, the Lawrence M. Weiner Award from Wayne State University School of Medicine Alumni Association, and the Award for Outstanding Contribution in Research Award from the American College of Emergency  Physicians, to name a few.  He has authored over 75 original research manuscripts, reviews, and textbook chapters, and has been an invited lecturer at many national and international symposia.  He has served as reviewer for NIH, DOD and AHA study sections as well as many medical and biomedical science journals. 

Ronny M. Otero, MD


Ronny M. Otero, MD


ronny m. otero, md

Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine

734-615-2766
oteror@med.umich.edu

Dr. Ronny Otero is Clinical Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine. Dr. Otero is originally from New York and received his Baccalaureate degree from Fordham University in the Bronx and later received his medical degree with Alpha Omega Alpha distinction from Howard University College of Medicine in Washington, D.C. This was followed by completion of a combined program in Internal Medicine and Emergency Medicine at Henry Ford Hospital in 2002 serving as chief resident from 2001-2002. He was a member of the Early Intervention Team while at Henry Ford to stabilize critically ill patients prior to intensive care unit admission. He has published in a variety of Emergency Medicine Textbooks and Review Books.

His research has focused on critical care states including sepsis and respiratory failure. He was co-investigator in an Observational Study of Sepsis and Pneumonia to Develop Diagnostic Tests sponsored by NIAID, Clinical Trials.gov ID: NCT00258869. This study performed metabolomics analysis of sepsis and septic shock to develop novel markers for sepsis in the acute setting. He has been sub-investigator in other biomarker studies including (MINDSET- Multi Marker Index for Risk Assessment of Sepsis in the Emergency Department) NCT 00472628. Additionally, he is interested in the clinical management of severe sepsis and septic shock as well as the post-cardiac arrest syndrome in the emergency department. Other interests include the interface between initial stabilization of hemodynamically unstable patients and transfer to the intensive care unit.

Elyas Sabeti, PhD


Elyas Sabeti, PhD


Elyas Sabeti, PhD

elyassabetic_0.jpg

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics                          

(734) 647-7259

sabeti@med.umich.edu

Elyas Sabeti is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Computational Medicine and
Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  He earned his Ph.D. in Eletrical Engineering from the
University of Hawaii at Manoa in December 2017, while working on development of data mining methods for Big Data using information theory and machine learning. He also earned his M.Sc. in Biomedical Engineering from Sharif University of Technology, 2012.

Elyas Sabeti's primary research interest includes developing models, algorithms and tools for analysis of Medical Big Data using information theory, machine learning and signal processing. More broadly, he is interested in Big Data Analytic using statistical learning and information theory.

Thomas Sanderson, PhD


Thomas Sanderson, PhD


tHOMAS SANDERSON, PhD

mj_thomas_sanderson_110716_01 (1).jpg

Associate Professor,  Emergency Medicine
Associate Professor,  Molecular & Integrative Physiology

(734) 764-4493

thsand@med.umich.edu

Research in the Sanderson lab is focused on understanding brain damage caused by ischemic insults during cardiac arrest, ischemic stroke, and neonatal hypoxia/ischemia. Two primary avenues of investigation are (1) the role mitochondrial dysfunction in death of neurons during post-ischemic reperfusion and (2) the development and clinical translation of a neuroprotective therapies that modulate the activity of mitochondria to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury.

 Ongoing mitochondrial mechanistic studies are focused on uncovering novel mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent cell death during neuronal reperfusion. These studies center around key inner mitochondrial membrane proteins and their role in mitochondrial dynamics, quality control, cristae maintenance, and apoptosis induction. Our studies utilize novel cell and animal models of cardiac arrest/resuscitation, stroke, and neonatal hypoxic/ischemic encephalopathy and transgenic mice to evaluate mitochondrial dysfunction.

The Sanderson lab is conducting pre-clinical large animal studies with a novel therapeutic strategy to manipulate mitochondrial activity. We have shown that limiting mitochondrial hyperactivity following brain ischemia can prevent ROS production and minimize injury. Our lab has invested substantial investigative effort uncovering the molecular mechanisms by which mitochondrial modulation initiates neuroprotection. This research has resulted in two awarded US patents, which form the foundation of our startup company, Mitovation, Inc. We are now at a critical pre-clinical phase in developing this therapeutic approach. Ongoing studies supported by the NIH and DoD are focused on investigating the mechanisms of this therapy and testing it in large animals. A human prototype has been developed and is undergoing regulatory testing to bring this therapeutic device to the clinic.

Phillip Scott, MD, MBA


Phillip Scott, MD, MBA


Phillip Scott, MD, MBA

Dr. Scott.png

Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine
Associate Chair Research, Emergency Medicine

734-232-2142
phlsctt@med.umich.edu

Dr. Scott’s research involvement has focused on clinical trial work in: 1) hyper-acute, thrombolytic, based stroke treatment strategies, 2) efforts to extend stroke treatment via neuronal protection mechanisms (both pharmacologic and hypothermic), 3) the development of mechanical-based clot removal and lysis in stroke, 4) methods to enhance treatment for subarachnoid hemorrhage care via hypothermia, 5) primary stroke prevention via enhanced identification of atrial fibrillation, 6) development of population and systems-based approaches to acute stroke care and research, particularly focusing on community delivery of acute stroke care (second-stage knowledge translation). Dr. Scott co-leads Michigan StrokeNet, the Regional Coordinating Center for the national NINDS StrokeNet network. This network was established in 2013 to speed the development and conduct of clinical trials in the areas of 1) stroke treatment, 2) stroke prevention, and 3) rehabilitation.

S.M. Reza Soroushmehr, PhD


S.M. Reza Soroushmehr, PhD


s.m. reza soroushmehr, phd

Research Investigator (DCMB),  Emergency Medicine

734-647-7259
ssoroush@med.umich.edu

Dr. S.M.Reza Soroushmehr is a research investigator in the department of Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics at the University of Michigan. He is also a member of Michigan Center for Integrative Research in Critical Care (MCIRCC). Prior to his current position he was a postdoctoral fellow in the Electrical and Computer Engineering department at McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. He was also a visiting student in the ECE department at McMaster University from June 2011 to April 2013. He received his B.Sc., M.Sc. and Ph.D. all in Computer Engineering.

Dr. Soroushmehr's research interests include the design and development of image processing methods applicable to computer-assisted clinical decision support systems, algorithm design and optimization and video processing. 

 

Nik Theyyunni, MD


Nik Theyyunni, MD


nik theyyunni, md

Clinical Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine
Co-Director, Emergency Ultrasound

734-763-7919
ntheyyu@umich.edu

Nik Theyyunni, MD is co-director of Emergency Ultrasound and a clinical instructor in the Department of Emergency Medicine and at the University of Michigan. He received his BS in Materials Science Engineering from Michigan State University in 2006 and his MD from Ohio State University College of Medicine in 2010. He completed his residency in Emergency Medicine at University of Michigan/St Joseph Mercy Hospitals in 2014. During medical school and residency he has completed extensive additional training in emergency applications of ultrasonography. Dr. Theyyunni’s research interests include clinical applications of sonography, medical education, and critical care.

M. Hakam Tiba, MD, MS


M. Hakam Tiba, MD, MS


m. hakam tiba, md, ms

Research Assistant Professor,  Emergency Medicine 

734-764-6702
tibam@med.umich.edu

Dr. Tiba is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Michigan.  He received his MD from the University of Damascus in 1991. In 1992, he moved to the United States to pursue a career in healthcare research. In 2015, Dr. Tiba received a Master’s of Science degree in Clinical Research Design and Statistical Analysis from the University of Michigan. Prior to joining the University of Michigan in 2012, Dr. Tiba worked as a research associate at Virginia Commonwealth University, Emergency Department for twelve years.

Dr. Tiba is a career researcher in the field of critical care and shock, with research interests spanning non-invasive monitoring techniques and devices to development of innovative resuscitative fluids and hemostatic strategies.  His work utilizes unique preclinical models allowing for rapid translational application of discoveries.  Dr. Tiba has played a significant role in the development and testing of new and novel critical care monitoring devices and therapies utilizing technologies such as bioimpedance and resonance Raman Spectroscopy. 

Dr. Tiba serves as peer reviewer for the American Journal of Emergency Medicine as well as a peer reviewer for the Tactical Combat Casualty Care Research (TCCCR) peer review panel of the Combat Casualty Care Research Program (CCCRP) for the Department of Defense U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (MRMC). In addition, Dr. Tiba has been serving as a scientist member for the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) since 2013. Dr. Tiba has presented at local and national scientific symposiums and conference and has published over 40 peer-reviewed articles and abstracts.

Dr. Tiba's work emphasizes the need for multidisciplinary collaboration and the incorporation of undergraduate and graduate students in his work.  He has mentored several graduate and undergraduate students and has received a mentor award in 2007 for mentoring a Goldwater Scholar engineering student.

J. Scott VanEpps, MD, PhD


J. Scott VanEpps, MD, PhD


j. scott vanepps, md, phd, FACEP

Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine
Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Assistant Professor, Macromolecular Science and Engineering
Investigator, Biointerfaces Institute

734-763-2702
jvane@med.umich.edu

Dr. VanEpps has a broad multidisciplinary background in the fields of bio/chemical engineering, molecular biology, and medicine.  His previous projects successfully combined engineering (both analysis and design) with traditional biological experiments using both in vitroand large animal models. Since coming to the University of Michigan, his research has focused on life threatening infections, and in particular those related to implantable medical devices.  That work is divided into both rapid diagnostics for bloodstream infection as well as novel treatment strategies.  With respect to diagnostics his lab is developing a novel ultrasensitive nanorod based PCR assay to detect bacteria in whole blood without culture.  With respect to treating life-threatening and medical device related infection, his lab focuses on fundamental understanding of bacterial adhesion to abiotic surfaces, development of novel antimicrobial nanomaterials, design of nanomaterials to prevent adhesion and colonization of implant surfaces, and new strategies to treat implanted medical device infection in situ. Technologies under development include, novel antimicrobial/antibiofilm nanomaterials, physical augmentation of antibiotic killing, and biofilm dispersal agents.      

Kevin R. Ward, MD


Kevin R. Ward, MD


kevin r. ward, md

WardKevin17(006).jpg

Director, Michigan Center for Integrative Research in Critical Care
Professor, Emergency Medicine

734-764-6706
keward@umich.edu

Dr. Ward is a Professor in the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan.  He received his B.S. in Physiology from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge in 1985 and his degree in medicine from Tulane University in New Orleans, LA in 1989.  Dr. Ward then completed a residency in Emergency Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh followed by a Resuscitation Research fellowship at the Ohio State University in Columbus, OH.  Prior to joining the University of Michigan in 2012, Dr. Ward was Professor and Associate Chair of Emergency Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) were he also founded and directed the VCU Reanimation Engineering Science Center (VCURES).  

Dr. Ward’s research interests span the field of critical illness and injury ranging from combat casualty care to the intensive care unit. His approach is to develop and leverage broad platform technologies capable of use throughout all echelons of care of the critically ill and injured as well as in all age groups.  Dr. Ward’s work has been funded by the NIH, Department of Defense, NSF, and industry.   He has published over 200 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters.

Dr. Ward’s passion is in creating programs which encourage true integration across the disciplines of medicine, engineering, data sciences, and entrepreneurship that accelerate discovery to true patient impact.  In addition to founding MCIRCC, he led the design and implementation of Michigan Medicine’s Fast Forward Medical Innovation (FFMI) program and served as its inaugural Executive Director from 2013-2018.  He is a serial innovator and entrepreneur in the field of emergency and critical care medicine and the recipient of Innovation and Commercialization awards from Virginia Commonwealth University, the University of Michigan Medical School, and the Department of Defense. 

In collaboration with the U.S. Army and its Joint Special Operations Training Medical Center, Dr. Ward developed and medically directed special training programs, which have been responsible for providing clinical training to over 1000 Special Operation Combat Medics.  For this work, Dr. Ward was awarded a Certificate for Patriotic Civilian Service by the Department of the Army and the Joint Special Operations Training Center.  Severing on numerous editorial and review boards in the field of resuscitation, emergency and critical care medicine, Dr. Ward also serves on the executive committee for the Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research (THOR).

Joseph Wider, PhD


Joseph Wider, PhD


Joseph Wider, Phd

wider.jpg

Post-Doctoral Fellow, Emergency Medicine
Post-Doctoral Fellow,  Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology

248-561-6387
jwider@med.umich.edu

Joe Wider earned his Ph.D. in Physiology from Wayne State University in March 2017. He received a bachelor of science in Physiology from Michigan State University in 2008. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Michigan Emergency Medicine Department and the Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology. Dr. Wider’s research interests focus on the molecular mechanisms of neurological injury caused by cardiac arrest with an emphasis on the causative role of mitochondria and developing treatments.